Terrorist trial in Denver

by Craig Masters
Jamshid Muhtorov is charged in Denver Federal Court as a terrorist. But, as recent as 2007, the UN supported Muhtorov’s status as a political refugee from the oppressive Uzbekistan government and the U.S., under the Bush administration, granted him legal permanent residency. This action was prompted by a massacre of protesters in the city of Andijan.

It seems that after the Uzbek Interior Ministry and National Security Forces massacred hundreds of unarmed civilian protesters in the streets of Andijan in 2005, President Bush joined the outcry of protests and condemned the Karimov government. It was at this time that Muhtorov joined the struggle for human rights in this former Soviet state that now holds more political prisoners than all other former soviets states combined. Unfortunately for the suffering Uzbek citizens, while the West was busy condemning the massacre and hoping for change in the government, citizens formed what came to be called the Islamic Jihad Group and found support for their resistance movement in the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan (IMU). IMU was quickly labeled a terrorist organization by the United States. IJG has not been linked to any activities since 2005.

When Barrack Obama assumed power and made no secret about his intentions to “fundamentally transform” America, relationship with the Uzbek regime was also transformed from one in which the Uzbek regime was ostracized by the West to being normalized and then supported with foreign aid money by the millions. While the details of how the citizens of Uzbekistan are forced into labor picking cotton are being widely reported around the world, the Obama regime recently announced the USAID mission director for Central Asia, Jonathan Addleton, was scheduled to visit Tashkent on January 22-27 according to the US embassy in Uzbekistan. The US aid money is reported to be in excess of $320 million. But an extensive internet search could find no articles reporting on Addleton’s visit to Tashkent. The U.S. Embassy in Uzbekistan reported no visit on its web site as of January 30, 2014.

It is a terrible, but true, fact that the Obama regime is by far the best financed, most heavily armed, and most technically advanced terrorist information source in the world. But Jamshid Muhtorov, whose friends and family are struggling to overthrow a dictator, is charged as being a terrorist for – among other things perhaps – carrying a couple of plastic-wrapped cell phones in the Chicago airport. The case hinges on illegal wire taps by the Obama regime’s NSA domestic spying activities. Each new revelation about the ever increasing extent of the NSA spies’ activities make momentary headlines before the sound-bite media outlets return their attention to covering drunken episodes of some entertainer. Meanwhile, little by little, the unconstitutional activities of the Obama regime push America ever closer toward a police state.

The story of Uzbekistans’ National Security Service forces firing on civilians in that far away country might seem unimportant to the pop culture of the one-minute media and too many Americans. Yet our own National Security Agency is proving to be every much a threat to US protesters’ freedoms as any dictatorship’s forces. Any group of conservatives can be labeled a terrorist group by Obama and his supporters and then targeted for surveillance and special attention by the regime. But our NSA is not the greatest physical threat to Americans’ freedom, liberty, lives and property. That threat is represented by the thousands and thousands of troops of the new heavily-armed “civilian army” created by the Obama regime to enforce the socialized health care law incorporated into the collection duties of the IRS.


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