Dems issue conflicting messages on Obamacare following Florida loss

By Jack Minor –

 

Debbie Wasserman-Schultz, chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee said in November, “You’re darn right that our candidates are going to run on the advantage that Obamacare will be going into the 2014 election. The choice will be very clear.”

 

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi echoed similar sentiments, saying that “Democrats stand tall in support of the Affordable Care Act.”

 

The Gazette  has previously reported on signs of disunity over Obamacare, however following this week’s win in Florida by Republican David Jolly against his Democratic opponent Alex Sink in a district that has not voted for a Republican for president since 1988 the Democrats now appear to be in total disarray over how to deal with Obamacare.

 

Sink had serious name recognition in the district compared to her opponent, having narrowly lost the 2010 governor’s race to incumbent Rick Scott. Her campaign also outspent Jolly’s by a ratio of 4:1. Additionally, Sink ran on the concept of “fix, don’t repeal” for Obamacare thinking this message would resonate with voters who approve of the law.

 

However, Democrats appear to now be proclaiming a variety of messages on Obamacare that are all over the political map.

 

Schultz said the reason Sink lost was because she did not run strongly enough in support of Obamacare, saying Jolly’s small margin of victory was due to his attacking the Affordable Care Act.

 

“Republicans fell short of their normal margin in this district because the agenda they are offering voters has a singular focus – that a majority of voters oppose – repealing the Affordable Care Act,” Schultz said.

 

MSNBC anchor Chuck Todd also told Democrats they need to double down on Obamacare.

 

“If you’re a Democrat and you go out there and say, ‘Oh man, health care, it scares me, I don’t want President Obama around,’ voters are going to know you’re full of it, that you’re just playing a game with them,” Todd warned.

 

Rush Limbaugh predicted that following Jolly’s victory he would not be surprised if vulnerable Democrats in red states start running against Obamacare for the purposes of getting reelected.

 

“You’ve got a bunch of Democrat senators who voted for it, but they’re doing everything they can to distance themselves from the vote,” Limbaugh said. “I’m just telling you, politics is copycat, it’s emulative — and these guys want to be reelected. So they’re running away from Obama as fast as they can, and they’re trying to distance themselves from Obamacare.”

 

The problem Democrats face is there is no realistic way for them to run away from the law. When the law was passed it was strictly along party line votes with every Republican voting against it. This effectively means that every problem that crops up as the result of Obamacare such as the millions of people who have received cancellation notices, is solely the Democrats responsibility since they are the only ones who voted for the language in the bill that created the problems.

Limbaugh explained that Democrats could get around this by attempting to claim that president Obama’s changing of the legislation by eliminating or delaying the portions he does not like and his special waivers for his supporters such as labor unions mean the law is not what they voted for.

 

“The way they could do it is say, it hasn’t been implemented the way they thought it was, that they were misled, that this is not at all what they voted for — and they’re right. Throw Obama under the bus. They don’t have to mention his name. Just, say, blame it on the exchanges. Blame it on anybody else. “It’s not what I voted for! I don’t like it the way it is,” and don’t be surprised if they try it.”


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